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Remembering Cadbury’s Factory in East Wall

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‘You can’t beat a Dairy Milk’ was the opinion of Pat O’Brien at the East Wall History Group’s recent event on the theme of Cadbury’s, who had a factory in the area until 1964. The room was passionately divided between the Dairy Milk and the Flake, and the poor Crunchie barely got a look-in.

What was your favourite bar as a child, or even now? What’s your guilty pleasure? Cadbury’s chocolate for many of us still evokes that comforting taste of childhood, despite the many fancier bars on sale now.

You could tell the hand wrapped ones by the twist on the end.

Pat Glynn was only hired to work for three months when he went to work in Cadbury’s first, but ended up staying 38 years. He remembers when they couldn’t satisfy demand for the Flake. So much so that the 36 per minute which the women packed by hand wasn’t able to keep up with the demand. A machine was invented to wrap them but there were a few disasters until they got it right. You could tell the hand wrapped ones by the twist on the end.

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Women outnumbered men in the Cadbury workforce by seven to one. Maria Mc Guirke was one of the women who started work in Cadbury’s in East Wall. She served a four year apprenticeship to become a confectioner, and had her papers with her to prove it.

Former workers look back with fondness on their days in Cadbury’s. They know they had it good. They had a steady job, were well paid. A uniform was supplied along with an allowance for laundry. They had a pension to look forward to, dinner dances and good friends to work alongside.

It was razed to the ground in hours one Saturday morning, before a preservation order could be lodged.

All of those present at the East Wall History Group’s recent event talked of the family atmosphere that existed, and it was still palpable in the room that night, along with the sadness for the loss of the old factory building in East Wall. It was razed to the ground in hours one Saturday morning, before a preservation order could be lodged.

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Maria Andreucetti’s family came from Lucca to East Wall bringing ice cream moulds with them. Their Fish and Chips were legendary along with the Choc Ices her dad made with the broken chocolate from the Cadbury factory up the road. The claim that they created the ’99 with the Flake was dispelled – another urban myth dies!

by Bernadette Larkin

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  1. Thank you for the article – I love its story-telling quality and images. I’m a Golden Crisp fan!

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